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24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time
is what is coming out this christmas day. george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then, singer/songwriter james taylor from a recent appearance of the national press club. after that, first lady michelle obama holds a holiday party with goldstar families. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handed leaflets for robert kennedy, and i always say when i was 10 and made the decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went to the liberal party headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in the new york. someone thought it was really cute, a little boy handed out leaflets, and she ask me why, and then made the case and the case against the opponent as well, and she said this was for you, and she handed me a box that looked like pastries, the white box with strings. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters, and there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and he said
. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work for him at republican headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white h
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
will on the history of religion and politics which and then james taylor monday night on c-span. >> hawaii senator daniel inouye i'd monday at the age of 88. he served for than 33 years as senator. a memorial service was held friday with president obama among the speakers and his funeral will be tomorrow in hawaii. his colleagues paid him tribute on the senate floor tuesday. this is about an hour. >> mr. president, i would just first say that my friend chairman of the ju dish yare committee has been honored to receive one of the senate's highest honors of the senate and icon grat late him on. that and i join with him in expressing my sadness over the passing of senator daniel inouye. he came to this government 60 years ago in the legislature hawaii. he came to congress when hawaii became a state in 1959, to the snalt in 63, second nonl service to robertbird. this is a seers man, a solid man, a patriot and one who always had a good spirit about whow he conducted his affairs and how rerelated to other members of the senate and to his constituents and to the american people. he served in the most vio
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
of the values we hold. it is not just our dna. it is our values. be our nation not defined by blood or religion but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you
some of the core conservative groups. one question and the together was whether his religion might be an issue for evangelical voters. we know even jokers -- evangelicals have a little bit of discomfort in the faith and what it is. we did some polling last november that suggested that while they may have some misgivings about the mormon faith, it was not going to be enough to sway them from voting for obama. and the level of enthusiasm was relatively strong, even all the way into the final weeks of the campaign. it was not a lot of evidence that was a problem for them. i think the broader concern at related to the primaries and it from these past experience was that he had a favorability problem. he just was not an appealing candidates. not in terms of firing up the ideological base but appealing to the average american. by august his favorability ratings were still deeply negative territory. he had 37 percent of voters viewing him favorably. that is a -15 margin. we have never seen a presidential candidates be that- that late in an election cycle. you could go through the previous
there needs to be more recognition of the unique cultural aspects, religion, culture, language. >> would use the the little bit to the american attitude of the chinese -- would you speak a little bit about the american attitude toward chinese investment in the united states? >> if you're asking me about the american viewpoint, you all represent that. if you ask me about the american government viewpoint, the administration welcomes foreign investment from all countries into the united states, including from china. obviously, there are certain issues of national security that have to be looked at, whether the investment comes from france, and germany, israel or china. there is a committee on foreign investment in the united states. out of the hundreds of billions of dollars a year of direct investment coming into the united states involving thousands of transactions, only about 100 per year are reviewed by the united states government, and only about six or seven of those involved chinese companies. and out of the hundred that the united states reviews, only about 6%-7% are ever modified. so,
michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations, then george will talks about religion and politics. later, james taylor from a recent appearance at the national press club. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i'm a big decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay. i went
and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door- to-door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come too. i think that is really important for us to u
should extend discrimination law, or you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we would get these cases and resolve them in terms of a particular liberal or conservative political agenda. there are ways of characterizing us that make more sense in terms of what we do. some of my colleagues prefer to adhere strictly to that text of the statute. others of my colleagues look more expensively to what we call the legislative history of the background of the statute, or a purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of those think it is important what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it. others on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. those sorts of things make sense. it is easier, i think, for court reporters to say that justice is liberal and that justice is conservative, and i do not think it is helpful in looking at what we do. >> let me switch to a question about -- more int
carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. i think all the people at this table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door-to- door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come t
politics and religion. >> both the house and the senate will return tomorrow. the senate is in a 10:00 a.m. eastern to work on two bills, one to extend provisions of the foreign intelligence service act and another is a relief package for areas affected by hurricanes can be. a vote is planned for 5:30 p.m. eastern on a least one of those measures. and the house returns at 2:00 p.m. eastern. their agenda depends on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiations. debate is possible in both chambers on any possible deal. live coverage at the house here on c-span and the senate on c- span 2. >> now a look at the war in syria and the potential for ssad regime.the a joined by former state department analyst, this is just over an hour. >> thank you, everybody, for coming this afternoon for a very timely discussion. on behalf of our chairman of the board, i want to welcome everybody to the center for national policy. i am the senior fellow for the middle list -- for the middle east here at cnp. we will discuss what is in store for the post-assad syria. mark twain once said that news of my death has
will on the historical link between religion and politics. at 10:50, singer-songwriter and james taylor, on c-span. >> the senate returns to legislative business on thursday and house as a performance session scheduled that day. the senate is in at 10:00 a.m. eastern for work on two bills. the first would extend provisions of the foreign intelligence surveillance act. the other is a relief package for those affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on our companion network, c-span2. house members are on standby as negotiations continue on the so- called fiscal cliff. >host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and health benefits could be impacted. joining us is josh boak. when we are talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are talking about here? guest: unemployment insurance is a combination of federal and state program. usually last 62 weeks. it is that extension beyond that six months time frame that we are talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. that is what automatically expires. we know that it costs about $30 billio
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)